Pest Control Las Vegas NV

Family Pest Control Service in Las Vegas Nevada

Storage Units And Insects

Storage UnitsSelf-storage units and public storage lockers have many obvious benefits. There is always a need for extra space and the benefit of having an uncluttered house drives many to take advantage of this option. In many cases, items are packed up without much thought and dropped into an aluminum locker. There is usually no more time spend on the storage unit once the lease is signed and door is closed. Once treasured personal belongings are now sitting, alone in the dark, never to be heard from again. Well, so maybe it is not all that dramatic. But, there are some unpleasant things that can happen when personal belongings are haphazardly left in storage. The problems are actually twofold. The first would be due to owner neglect, and the second would be due to dilapidated facilities.

Owner Neglect

Some people simply do not take care to thoughtfully pack items in preparation for storage. This is a fairly easy fix, and just requires some time and diligence. There are a few common sense ways to protect items from damage during packing, moving and storing. Any glass or delicate items should be properly cushioned in newspaper, bubble wrap or even blankets to protect them from accidental breakage. To prevent clothing from being eaten by moths or made into a home by other insects, place them in airtight container or use moth balls throughout the unit as a deterrent to bugs. Clearly label each box, tote or bag to indicate what contents are inside and if any special instructions (such as “fragile” or “flammable”) apply. Finally, do not use any boxes that once contained food to store any objects that insects may be remotely interested in exploring. Even aged scents may attract new insects for vermin to a storage unit.

Dead RoachesNeglected Facilities

Although property owners have the best of intentions, not every compound can be a Keyport Self Storage. Beyond that, there are certain unavoidable effects of aging. Once solid building structures can become corrupt over time by weather, misuse, mistreatment, and infestations. Some of these issues area avoidable, but some are just par for the course and a part of nature that must be accepted. For example, rust occurs when metals are constantly exposed to the elements and oxidation forms. This can be regularly treated through cleaning processes, proper irrigation and special paints that are rust resistant. However, nothing can fully prevent rust from forming. It is up to the property management to keep an eye on the affected areas and make any necessary adjustments and maintenance to the property. Rusty buildings create holes that small rodents and large insects can easily enter to wreak havoc on the contents. The most common insects to enter closed in spaces are termites, spiders, water bugs and bees or wasps during nesting season. The cool, dark spaces are ideal for exploration and making webs, nests or cocoons that will not be disturbed. Period and consistent treatments with effective pesticides will eliminate this problem and prevent future infestations. Likewise, educating the public and encouraging renters to understand their responsibilities will help the overall health and longevity of the storage unit and property.

As seen in his G-to-the-Plus zone, Mr. Holdeman helps maintain a marketing business. He grew up in lovely Cali.

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September 3, 2013 at 8:13 pm Comments (0)

Buying A Home? Have It Inspected!

Home_InspectionBefore any home-purchase contract is ever signed, a potential home-buyer should, most definitely, have an official home-inspection performed on the property.  In fact, the inspection should be included in the actual contract as a condition of closing the sale.  Some things that could be uncovered might be structural malfunctions, electrical systems not up to code, defective roofing, dry rot and pest infestations, etc.

But even before an inspection is performed, an official disclosure, in writing from the seller, should be obtained.  With that being said, however, that disclosure should not be considered all-inclusive.  Any number of home-owners #1) may not even be aware of any possible hazards or malfunctions which means, of course, they would not even be reported and #2) an on-going problem that a seller has lived with for years may be honestly ‘forgotten’ by him or her, and not divulged.

Putting It All Together:

 

#1:  Do Your Own Inspection:

This should be accomplished before any formal inspection is scheduled and could be done before an offer is made, as well.  Ask the seller if he or she is willing to have you come in to look around and make notations.  If the homeowner has nothing or little to hide, they will welcome the request.

Eyeballing every nook and cranny is vital since big problems can hide is small spaces.  One scrutinizing, prospective buyer, with the help of a magnifying lens, noticed incredibly small bugs nestled inside one bedroom’s baseboards, only to discover they were nocturnal bedbugs—a nightmare that is almost impossible to get rid of.   A new homeowner bought a beautiful four year-old residence and discovered, shortly after moving in, cockroaches would scatter when the kitchen light was turned on in the wee-hours of the morning.  Know the home before it becomes a part of your family!

#2:  The Seller’s Inspection Report:

At the risk of sounding mean-spirited, don’t trust an inspection report the seller may voluntarily provide.  Certainly accept it, but use it as an initial part of the inspection process, and nothing more.  It could be very valid and accurate, but as stated earlier, problems could exist that the homeowner genuinely isn’t even aware of.  One shoddy home builder in a small community was out to save money and built homes whose electrical systems were below code; and were fire hazards waiting to happen.  How the homes passed inspection remained a mystery.

#3:  A Professional Inspection:

Hiring a seasoned pro, who knows exactly what to look for, is your peace of mind!   A veteran professional should take a good 2-3 hours to examine everything from the roofing, to the exterior siding, plumbing, electrical and heating systems, drainage, foundation, drywall, gutters etc.   If at all possible, be available during the inspection to ask questions and get a feel for what problems might be very minor or any revelations that could be a reason for real concern, such as asbestos or lead.

Those Pesky Varmints: 

 

As per LRETX.com, request a pest report!  A licensed, structural pest-control inspector thrives on finding pesky, living things in or around a home that could pose a health risk and/or structural damage.  He’ll look for:

1:  termites/flying beetles/powder-post beetles/carpenter ants/carpenter bees

2:  bedbugs/cockroaches

3:  rodents, especially mice

4:  dry rot (fungus)

5:  moles…your yard could turn into a maze of large mounds or tunnels

If nothing is found that would compromise the sale of the house; you’re good to go!  If potential problems were uncovered, you have justification to negotiate the selling price or you can back out, assuming your contract has allowed you to do so.

But the bottom line remains:  have any potential residence thoroughly inspected since you have way too much at stake not to!

Residing in Nebraska as a retired educator, Karen spends much of her time writing about the real estate industry.

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May 24, 2013 at 5:23 pm Comments (0)
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